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Julie Hale

Julie is an extremely  accomplished and very dependable screen and theatre actor who brings  presence and charisma to all of her characters.


Born in Dublin she began her career as Rachel in  the acclaimed MY LEFT FOOT before her training in Dublin, New York and  London enabled her to attain stage credits in the UK as well as the US  and Ireland.


Julie undertook the role of Siobhan in  the National Theatre’s THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE  NIGHT-TIME worldwide tour and the subsequent season at the Piccadilly Theatre, London.


Her television work includes  stints in RIVER CITY and SHETLAND and she will appear in HIS  DARK MATERIALS (Season 2) and THE NEST on BBC.


Julie's most recent role as Maureen in THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANE received glowing reviews: 


An exquisite central performance from Julie Hale as the fragile but finally terrifying Maureen Joyce Macmillan – The Scotsman


Holding much of the narrative backbone, Hale undertakes a triumphantly discomfiting performance as Maureen. Her frustrations are understandable, her methods more than questionable. The flitters of imagination and flirtations with McAndrew’s Pato all persuade the audience of her naivety and grievances. Hale carries the crux of the story’s weight, in the changes and revelations, doing so without giving the game away until the crescendo moments. Gradually, we realise the truth when we see there’s no more cutting insult than a recognition you’re becoming one of your parents. And as Maureen sits there, huddled in her mother’s rocking chair, the cycle completes, Hale’s performance has come to a tightly constructed, well-executed perfection - Dominic Corr. Corr Blimey


Julie Hale in the role as Maureen is fantastic. She absolutely gets the complexity of the character: from the minute she enters you feel her resentment and bitterness—her lines are delivered with frustration that have you surmise her suffering of being isolated and blaming her mother for the life she is living - Across Theatre Arts

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